Pieces of History

Boy’s velvet tailcoat, 1881, from the collection of the Chemung County Historical Society

Boy’s velvet tailcoat, 1881, from the collection of the Chemung County Historical Society

Oil portrait of mustachioed man that once hung in Chemung County supreme court, 1880, from the collection of the Chemung County Historical Society

Oil portrait of mustachioed man that once hung in Chemung County supreme court, 1880, from the collection of the Chemung County Historical Society

Fan made of palm fronds with satin binding, 1880, from the collection of the Chemung County Historical Society

Fan made of palm fronds with satin binding, 1880, from the collection of the Chemung County Historical Society

Knee-length, white cotton petticoat, 1880s, from the collection of the Chemung County Historical Society

Knee-length, white cotton petticoat, 1880s, from the collection of the Chemung County Historical Society

The Knights Who Say Columbus by Rachel Dworkin, ArchivistAmerica is a nation of immigrants but it often has a troubled relationship with them.  During the late-19th century, America experienced a massive influx of immigrants.  Many of them were from predominantly Catholic countries including Italy, Poland and Ireland.  The native born Anglo-Saxon Protestant stock looked upon these new Americans with fear and distrust.  They formed explicitly anti-Catholic fraternal organization including the Junior Order of United American Mechanics and the Scottish Rite Masons.In response, Catholics formed their own society.  The Knights of Columbus were founded by Father Michael McGivney in the spring of 1882 in New Haven, Connecticut.  Their goal was to unite American Catholics and provide financial security to the dependents of workers killed or injured on the job.  In order bolster their patriotic credentials they named themselves after Christopher Columbus, who was both a Catholic and the first white explorer to colonize the Americas.  (READ MORE)

The Knights Who Say Columbus by Rachel Dworkin, Archivist

America is a nation of immigrants but it often has a troubled relationship with them.  During the late-19th century, America experienced a massive influx of immigrants.  Many of them were from predominantly Catholic countries including Italy, Poland and Ireland.  The native born Anglo-Saxon Protestant stock looked upon these new Americans with fear and distrust.  They formed explicitly anti-Catholic fraternal organization including the Junior Order of United American Mechanics and the Scottish Rite Masons.

In response, Catholics formed their own society.  The Knights of Columbus were founded by Father Michael McGivney in the spring of 1882 in New Haven, Connecticut.  Their goal was to unite American Catholics and provide financial security to the dependents of workers killed or injured on the job.  In order bolster their patriotic credentials they named themselves after Christopher Columbus, who was both a Catholic and the first white explorer to colonize the Americas.  (READ MORE)

Beaded wall pocket, 1880, from the collection of the Chemung County Historical Society

Beaded wall pocket, 1880, from the collection of the Chemung County Historical Society

Red and blue silk handkerchief, 1880, from the collection of the Chemung County Historical Society

Red and blue silk handkerchief, 1880, from the collection of the Chemung County Historical Society

Child’s high-laced leather shoes, 1880s, from the collection of the Chemung County Historical Society

Child’s high-laced leather shoes, 1880s, from the collection of the Chemung County Historical Society

Photograph of ladies at tea, 1880s, from the collection of the Chemung County Historical Society

Photograph of ladies at tea, 1880s, from the collection of the Chemung County Historical Society

Harvest Time at the Museum, by Erin Doane, curatorThe season is wrapping up for our three small garden beds out in front of the museum. There are still a lot of tomatoes slowly turning red and the ornamental corn still has a ways to go but we’ve harvested nearly everything else. For the size of the gardens, I’d say we had a fairly good harvest. After finally defeating (or at least strongly discouraging) the squirrels, almost everything grew well. The runner beans didn’t do that well and the peas and spinach were just planted too late but otherwise, I’d call it a success. (READ MORE)

Harvest Time at the Museum, by Erin Doane, curator

The season is wrapping up for our three small garden beds out in front of the museum. There are still a lot of tomatoes slowly turning red and the ornamental corn still has a ways to go but we’ve harvested nearly everything else. For the size of the gardens, I’d say we had a fairly good harvest. After finally defeating (or at least strongly discouraging) the squirrels, almost everything grew well. The runner beans didn’t do that well and the peas and spinach were just planted too late but otherwise, I’d call it a success. (READ MORE)